New Research in Dance - EMBODIED DECOLONIZATION. Cutcha Risling Baldy. Whinist’e’-xoniwh (I am happy/my body-is aware, has feeling)

Department of Dance
New Research in Dance Studies: In-Tension-Ally-Ties
Coordinated by Jacqueline Shea Murphy   
Magnolia Yang Sao Yia, Assistant Coordinator

EMBODIED DECOLONIZATION

Speaker: Cutcha Risling Baldy
Associate Professor, Native American Studies, Humboldt State University
Whinist’e’-xoniwh (I am happy/my body-is aware, has feeling): Embodied decolonization and Indigenous ceremonial dance revitalization

This presentation explores how ceremonial practices (re)inscribe Indigenous women’s bodies and how memory is strengthened and healed through movement, meditation and dance. 

Discussant: Mark Minch-de Leon
Assistant Professor, English Department, UC Riverside

October 10, 2018
Wednesday, 4:10-6:00 pm
Dance Studio Theatre, ATHD 102 (Athletics and Dance Building)
Free and open to the campus

Ongoing critical discussions about trauma and the embodiment of trauma as epigenetic markers have also lead to reexaminations of historical trauma that focus not just on perceived deficits of inherited trauma and grief but also on inherited traits of resistance, survival and resilience. Indigenous survivance – expressed through our narratives, built in to our philosophies and embodied through ceremony is also key to how ceremonial dance embodies decolonial praxis. This presentation explores how ceremonial practices (re)inscribe Indigenous women’s bodies and how memory is strengthened and healed through movement, meditation and dance. Primarily the presentation looks at the revitalization of the women’s coming-of-age ceremony for the Hoopa Valley Tribe in Northern California and analyzes the “recall” Native women in this community carry with them through embodied memory that demonstrates how ceremonial dance combats settler colonial heteropatriarchy and ongoing gender violence.

Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy is an Assistant Professor and Department Chair of Native American Studies at Humboldt State University. Her research is focused on Indigenous feminisms, California Indians and decolonization. She is the author of a popular blog that explores issues of social justice, history and California Indian politics and culture. www.cutcharislingbaldy.com/blog  

Dr. Risling Baldy's first book We Are Dancing For You: Native feminisms and the revitalization of women's coming-of-age ceremonies is available with the University of Washington Press and major book sellers and retailers. Dr. Risling Baldy is Hupa, Yurok and Karuk and an enrolled member of the Hoopa Valley Tribe in Northern California. In 2007, Dr. Risling Baldy co-founded the Native Women's Collective, a nonprofit organization that supports the continued revitalization of Native American arts and culture.

Mark Minch-de Leon (Susanville Indian Rancheria) is an assistant professor of Indigenous Studies in the Department of English at UC Riverside. He has a Ph.D. in Rhetoric with a designated emphasis in Gender, Women, and Sexuality, and has held postdoctoral fellowships at the Center for the Americas, Wesleyan University, and the Center for the Humanities at Tufts.

Presentations are followed by dialogue with audience, then reception on the patio.

INFORMATION: (951) 827-3245 performingarts@ucr.edu www.dance.ucr.edu
Co-sponsored by the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies, UC Riverside; Costo Chair in American Indian Affairs; and Faculty Commons: Reclamation and Native American Communities.

 

Wednesday, October 10 at 4:10pm to 6:00pm

Athletics & Dance Building, Dance Studio Theatre, ATHD 102
Athletics & Dance Building, Riverside, CA 92521

Event Type

Arts, Dance, Lectures & Presentations

Audience

Faculty & Staff, Graduate Students, Undergraduate Students, Transfer Students

Cost

Free and open to the campus

Department
Dance
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